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Lipoblastomatosis
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Lipoblastomatosis

Contributors: Ricardo Guerra, Susan Burgin MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis are benign tumors of embryonal adipocytes. While lipoblastomas present as solitary, well-circumscribed nodules or tumors (see lipoblastoma), lipoblastomatosis presents as ill-defined, diffusely infiltrating plaques. Slow growth is usual, but occasionally, lipoblastomatosis with rapid growth is seen. Most patients present before the age of 3, and males are more commonly affected. Lipoblastomatosis may be present at birth and it develops only rarely after the age of 10.

Lipoblastomatosis is most commonly found in the soft tissue of the extremities, including the axilla, shoulders, elbow, and hands. Involvement of the face, neck, buttocks, and mediastinum have also been reported. Patients can be asymptomatic or develop symptoms based on affected structures and organs.

Codes

ICD10CM:
D17.9 – Benign lipomatous neoplasm, unspecified

SNOMEDCT:
400149007 – Lipoblastomatosis

Look For

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Diagnostic Pearls

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Lipoma

Lipoblastoma

Other embryonal tumors:
Nevus lipomatosus superficialis

Myxoid liposarcoma – Also includes myxoid stroma, but uncommon in children under 10 years of age.

Hemangioma

Best Tests

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Management Pearls

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Therapy

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References

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Last Updated:03/28/2017
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Lipoblastomatosis
A medical illustration showing key findings of Lipoblastomatosis : Arm, Leg, Tumor, Foot or toes
Clinical image of Lipoblastomatosis - imageId=2453048. Click to open in gallery.
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